Tag: thailand

05
Apr

Floating Solar Farm in Rayong and China

A giant pond inside SCG Chemicals’ plant at Rayong’s Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate was originally developed to deal with a water shortage crisis that tarnished their production about 10 years ago. The 20-rai pond (3.2 hectares), equivalent to about 10 football fields, has become an experimental site and the country’s first floating solar farm.
For visitors and viewers like us, it looks like a floating mirror in a dam. Almost half of it has been covered with about 3,400 photovoltaic cells to convert the sun’s energy into power. These cells stand on a special pontoon the company specifically built.

A floating solar farm is shown at a pond at SCG Chemicals plant in Rayong's Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate. (Photo courtesy SCG Chemicals)

A floating solar farm is shown at a pond at SCG Chemicals plant in Rayong’s Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate. (Photo courtesy SCG Chemicals)

The largest floating solar farm in the world is in the Chinese city of Huainan. It has been built on top of a former coal mine, which had become a lake after being flooded with groundwater. The 40-megawatt power plant consists of 120,000 solar panels covering an area of more than 160 football fields. The $45-million investment could help power 15,000 homes in China.

If you’re interested in having a look at the drone footage of the largest floating solar farm in the world, watch the clip!

Solar is an increasing industry, especially in Asia, and to see innovations like these, it gives us hope that it will only be rising in the coming years.

Contact us today for your personalised service and installation advice.

03
Apr

Will Thailand Give Renewable Energy a Chance?

Renewable Energy No More?

The Minister of Energy announced recently that the Thai government will no longer be purchasing electricity from renewable power projects for the next five years to come. The reason behind this is because such projects have caused retail electricity tariffs to increase by 20-25 satangs per unit, and the electricity system apparently has enough installed capacity for now.
If this policy was to be implemented, it will rewind a decade of success that Thailand has achieved on the path toward sustainable energy creation.

give renewable energy a chance

Image provided by Bangkok Post: Monks pass by a solar farm in Ayutthaya. Renewable energy, incubated over the past decade, now is ready to hatch.

Over these past 10 years, Thailand became the leader in Southeast Asia of the renewable energy sector.
As the leader, we produced more clean energy, contributing to reduced greenhouse gas emissions, creating new jobs, utilising local resources, and spurring invaluable know-how and skills for the Thai energy industry.
Renewable energy is also beneficial to the entire electricity system in the country. The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (Egat) has showed how solar power plants have contributed to system peak load reduction, equivalent to around 1 gigawatt of power. This one gigawatt is about the size of a nuclear power plant, or three coal-fired power plants that we have not had to build because of this renewable energy option.

The subsidy for renewables in the past has benefited all Thai people. The problem is that these benefits have not been addressed or quantified by the policymakers. Therefore the argument that renewables cause rate increases is an argument that doesn’t tell the comeplete story.

“By design, the renewable energy subsidy should eventually be cancelled once it becomes competitive with conventional electricity sources. Indeed, we are at a point now where renewable power projects in Thailand may not need a subsidy like they did before.”

“Like eggs that are ready to be hatched, Thailand’s renewable power industry has incubated over the past decade. Just about when the eggs are ready to be hatched, the government should not freeze them. A tangible and fair policy would be to open electricity generation to competition by setting up a bidding process that allows renewable power projects to demonstrate their competitiveness with fossil-fuel based power plants.” 

The original article and opinion piece was supplied by the Bangkok Post. It was written by an independent Energy Consultant based in California, USA, named Sopitsuda Tongsopit, PHD.

Let us know how you feel about this and whether or not you’d be interested in going off-grid, or simply want to have the option to generate your own renewable energy for your home. Eyekandi-Solar is here to assist you!

21
Mar

Deregulation of Energy Purchased from Private Solar Rooftops Expected

Solar rooftop power can be purchased by the DAEDE

The Department of Alternative Energy Development and Efficiency is expected to propose a project to the National Energy Policy Committee headed by Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha next month, which is intended to purchase power generated from solar rooftops of households and commercial buildings.

Original article posted by Thai PBS English News

Deregulation Expected in April

The department chief Mr Praphon Wongtharua has been quoted in saying that, ‘in the initial stage, it was estimated that as much as 300 megawatts of electricity generated from solar rooftops would be purchased at a price not exceeding the price of energy sold by the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (Egat)’.

The project which is now being decided on between the DAEDE and the energy regulatory committee before it is to be submitted to the energy policy committee chaired by the energy minister and, finally, the project will go to the National Energy Policy Committee for approval.

Mr Praphon disclosed that currently the private sector is capable of generating power from their solar rooftops for their own use at a cost relatively less than the price charged by either the metropolitan electricity authority or the provincial electricity authority.

However, he pointed out that ‘the private sector’s power generators would not gain the optimum benefits from solar rooftops if their leftover power cannot be sold into the power grid system’.

Purchase of energy from solar rooftops expected to be deregulated in April

Purchase of energy from solar rooftops expected to be deregulated in April

Benefits

It will be beneficial to the power producers if state utilities are allowed to buy energy from the private sector’s solar rooftops, he added.

The department has commissioned the Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, to conduct a study on the most appropriate format for the purchase of power generated from solar rooftops of the private sector.

There will be three categories of solar rooftop energy sellers: households, big commercial buildings of big factories, and medium-sized buildings or factories. The prices will be 2.30-2. 50 baht/ unit for households; which is less than one baht/unit for big buildings or factories; and one baht for medium-sized buildings or factories.

If you’re interested in having a solar rooftop installed on your household to enable you to benefit from this, don’t hesitate to contact us at Eyekandi-Solar!

19
Feb

Power of the Sun

Wandee Khunchornyakong built the first solar farm in Thailand eight years ago. Her company is now the largest solar power supplier in the region. See the original post here from the Bangkok Post

EARLY BIRD

Wandee Khunchornyakong always wakes up at around 5 am. As chairperson and CEO of Solar Power Company Group (SPCG), she likes to start her day when the sun rises.

Her working day ends late. She goes to bed at midnight. Hard work is her routine, which she has kept from a young age. She turns 60 this year, but retirement is not part of the plan.

Wandee built her first – and Thailand’s first – solar farm in 2010. Since then her company has grown in leaps and bounds. SPCG now has 43 subsidiaries. From its headquarters in Thong Lor, it manages 36 solar farms and has expanded the business to Japan and other ASEAN countries. Today SPCG is the largest solar-power-generating company in Southeast Asia.

As a working woman – one of only a handful in the energy industry – she never thought that her dream of generating clean energy would become the huge business it is now.

“I am not somebody who comes from a family with a big name. When I returned to work after early retirement, I chose a business that was innovative and of the kind that nobody had done before,” she said, recalling her original decision to set up the company in 2009.

Wandee had worked as an executive at several companies in different fields, including a solar-cell company. She stepped down in 2006, at the age of 48, to pursue a PhD in Educational Leadership at Suan Dusit University. She thought she would become a teacher in her senior years. But destiny had other plans.

power of the sun_wandee

VISIONARY MIND

Back in 2008, the government announced a policy to promote renewable energy development. It offered a 25-year licence for private companies to operate solar-power plants and feed electricity to the utility grid of the Provincial Electricity Authority (PEA).

At that time, the solar-farm business was in its infancy and wasn’t a priority for financial creditors. For almost a year after the policy was announced, no company applied for a license.

When Wandee learned about the government’s initiative from Dr Piyasawat Amaranand, the former Energy Minister of Surayud Chulanont’s government, it motivated her to research the solar-power-plant business.

“I was interested in solar power because it’s a global trend. I know green technology will be the future for Thailand,” she said.

She spent months studying the business possibilities until she was certain she would have a chance at success. Thailand has strong solar-radiation levels throughout the year when compared to other countries in the region, and even developed countries where solar farms have been implemented, such as Germany and Japan.

“With the same investment for setting up a solar-power plant, a solar farm in Thailand will have more energy output, perhaps double to triple that of developed countries. I knew the possibility of success was high and the risk for failure was very low,” she said.

Get in touch with our Eyekandi Solar team to get a quote for your own solar installation.

30
Jan

Shining a light on Thailand’s electricity woes

Opening up the power market might hold the key to more efficient, less costly delivery of power to consumers.

Original article written by Yuthana Praiwan of the Bangkok Post. There is an expected 50% increase in Thailand’s electricity price in the up coming 10 years, from 3.66 to 5.50 baht! This may sounds somewhat alarming, however Mr Siri, the Thailand’s minister of Energy has mentioned that “The way to cut energy bills is not through subsidies, but by increasing the industry’s efficiency and innovation.” He is also quoted on saying that “we struck a balance between monopoly and free market, and let the ERC work out the rules of the game to let them compete fairly.” This was with regards to the issue of ‘monopoly’ in the energy sector. However, the Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) was set up in 2007 for a transparent system of checks and balances to monitor the players in the sector.

Shining a light on Thailand's electricity woes

Shining a light on Thailand’s electricity woes

“We struck a balance between monopoly and free market, and let the ERC work out the rules of the game to let them compete fairly,” the energy minister says. The ERC opened up an auction for licences for renewable power for small power producers under firm-power purchase agreements (a SPP Hybrid firm), last year, when the first case study of a deregulated energy sector was launched. During that process, 300 megawatts was auctioned and the ERC received applications from more than 85 firms with a combined capacity of 2,464MW. To read the original Bangkok Post article and about Thailand’s electricity woes, click this link. To get a quote for your personal solar array, to start generating your own electricity, click here.

19
Jan

Nexif Energy to supply EGAT with 110MW

The energy project could reach the financial close by the first quarter this year.

Nexif Energy has announced that it has signed an engineering, procurement and construction contract for its 110 megawatt (MW) cogeneration project in Rayong Province, Thailand’s. Nexif was granted the project in June 2017 and is making progress fast, towards achieving financial close by the end of March 2018.

The project is set to provide electricity to the Electricity Generation Authority of Thailand (EGAT) under a 25-year power purchase agreement and supply energy to Asian industrial customers. It will be financed by a group of leading investors on a non-recourse basis with Standard Chartered Bank at the forefront of the financing section.

Nexif Energy providing power in Thailand

Nexif Energy providing power in Thailand

Ravi Chandran, Executive Vice President at Nexif Energy, stated, “Our project is well structured, as it is underwritten by a long term PPA with creditworthy off-taker, has long term gas supply contracts with a leading gas supplier and has the ability to supply electricity and steam to industrial customers. We look forward to completing remaining permitting and financing by first quarter 2018.”

The turn key engineering, procurement and construction fixed price  Contract was signed by a group of Korean construction companies consisting of Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction Co., Ltd (“Doosan”) and SC Engineering Co., Ltd. It includes the supply and build of a General Electric 6FA gas turbine operating in combined cycle with a Doosan DST-G20 steam turbine.

 

12
Jan

EGAT says the Market Quota will now end

Energy policymakers are currently planning to end the twenty year quota regime by expanding the state-controlled power generation business to private sector competition, quoted by the Energy Minister himself Mr Siri Jirapongphun.

Thailand will now be removing the special quota from state-owned Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT). “Thailand needs to increase power supply and allowing the market to set its price will be essential to developing the power generation industry,” he said.
The deregulation of power generation will be applied to both the renewable energy industry as well as the fossil fuels industry.

The power price is currently at an average of 3.6 baht per kilowatt hour.

Egat's Mae Moh power plant in Lampang. Both fossil fuels and renewable energy will be deregulated. JIRAPORN KUHAKAN

EGAT’s Mae Moh power plant in Lampang. Both fossil fuels and renewable energy will be deregulated. JIRAPORN KUHAKAN

By JUNE 2018, policymakers have planned to open an auction under the small power producer programme, which will involve semi-firm power purchase agreements with a total of 269 megawatts.
The move is aimed at advancing the efficiency of the sector, of EGAT, and of other state-owned energy firms like PTT Plc.

Details of the deregulation programme will become finalised in the new national Power Development Plan (PDP), which is currently being revised by the relevant department.  The new PDP, set to be finalised in March 31, will replace the existing PDP, which was drafted in 2014.

The current rules that state that one fifth of the country’s power must come from renewable energy sources by the year 2036 may also undergo major revisions. At present, renewable energy sources in Thailand account for 12% of the country’s power.

Companies from the private sector and EGAT (which recently expressed interest in importing LNG), will now be allowed to enter the business, which previously fell under the monopoly of PTT.

 

To get a quote for your solar installation, get in touch with us!

Find the original Bangkok Post article here.

08
Jan

Philippines’ Solar usage ranked 1st in the developing world

This year, the Philippines has been ranked at number No. 1 among the developing countries in Asia in terms of the use of solar PV systems for electricity generation, according to a Dutch consultancy firm.

“The Philippines is still relatively young when it comes to solar development, but was able to get seven active projects ranked in the top 50 list,” Solarplaza research analyst Marco Dorothal said in a report.

PV solar array in the Philippines

PV solar array in the Philippines

He also added that the biggest operational project in the Philippines was currently the 132.5-megawatt Cadiz solar power plant developed by Helios Solar Energy Corp., which was a joint venture between the Thailand-based Soleq Solar Co. and Gregorio Araneta Inc.

Solarplaza also noted that last year in March, the local firm Solar Philippines started erecting a 150-MW solar plant in Tarlac, making it the largest solar power project so far for the country.

Solar Philippines has also opened the country’s first PV module factory!

As of June last year, Solarplaza announced that the Philippines’ solar power installed capacity had reached 900 MW.

Even though the Philippines is going through some policy changes, the government is still supporting solar and the renewable energy sector.

“According to the International Energy Agency, solar power is turning into the cheapest source of new electricity generation capacity in many countries, especially in Asia,” the article provided.

“Solar is forging ahead in global power markets as it becomes the cheapest source of electricity generation in many places, including China and India,” IEA executive director Fatih Birol stated.

The IEA expects that over the next 25 years, the world’s growing energy needs are met first by renewables and natural gas as fast-declining costs turn solar power into the cheapest source of new electricity generation.

Eyekandi-Solar is on the same band-wagon, and assisting Thailand in advancing their solar PV production and renewable energy generation.

Visit our website for more information and a quote.

29
Dec

BCPG Renewable Energy and the Blockchain

A SET-listed renewable power arm of oil refiner and retailer Bangchak Corporation Plc (BCP), is employing the blockchain to trade and supply Thailand with electricity, says the president and chief executive of BCPG Bundit Sapianchai.

BCPG recently signed an agreement in Bangkok with Perth-based Power Ledger to bring person-to-person renewable energy trading to Thailand and Southeast Asia.

Mr Bundit and Mr Martin signed an agreement with Power Ledger to jointly develop solar power and micro grid systems.

Mr Bundit and Mr Martin signed an agreement with Power Ledger to jointly develop solar power and micro grid systems.

Mr Bundit said BCPG plans to set up the first micro-grid in Bangkok, which will be the first in Southeast Asia to be used by the leading property developer, Sansiri Plc, for its T77 project.

The T77 project will span 80 rai. The first project with a distributed power grid is expected to start operations by mid-2018.

“The Power Ledger energy-trading platform allows building managers to trade renewable energy from solar panels installed at each building with autonomous financial settlement enabled via the use of a secure banking interface,” said Mr Bundit.

If you’re interested in Blockchain technology and how the renewable energy industry is moving forward with it, clock here to read the full article on the Bangkok Post website.
Here at EyeKandi-Solar would love to hear from you and what your thoughts are on the blockchain and paying for your energy this way.

Click here to contact us

19
Dec

Toshiba lands 6-MW solar panel deal in Thailand

Toshiba Corp

Toshiba has a very impressive record of success in the renewable energy sector, supplying diverse technologies in the fields of system connections and system stabilisation.
Based on this vast experience and trust in the industry, Toshiba photovoltaic systems are now available worldwide.
Toshiba is contributing to society by creating a prosperous tomorrow through next-generation green energy. They recently unveiled a contract to deliver 6 MW of solar panels in Thailand, saying this is its biggest order of its kind in the Asian region.

The deal, the value of which was not disclosed, was awarded by Thailand-based Eight Solar Co Ltd to Toshiba Energy Systems & Solutions Corp.

The equipment will be used in rooftop projects involving six stores within the Home Pro home improvement chain, in line with its plans to lower its dependence on conventional power supply and reduce its carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.

Toshiba Corp Solar Project in Thailand

Toshiba Corp Solar Project in Thailand

Toshiba and Home Pro

So far, the following Home Pro stores have Solar Rooftop PV Panels installed: Suratthani, Chumphon, Khaoyai, Lopburi, Phrae, Ratchaphruek, Akekamai-Ramintra.

Toshiba noted that it will support Thailand in its efforts to “realise a low carbon society and stable power supply.” The country, which is heavily reliant on fossil fuels, aims to increase the share of solar power to 25% by 2021.

Like Toshiba, Eyekandi-Solar is motivated to assist in the reduction of fossil fuels, by installing PV panels, and Solar arrays where needed.

Contact us here for a quote.