Tag: solar

14
Dec

Wind, Solar and Renewable projects on the Climb in Thailand

A recent report by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) and the Thai ministry of energy found that renewable energy could account for 37% of the country’s electricity by 2036.

Currently, around 18% of Thailand’s power is generated from renewable sources. The bulk is generated from fossil fuel products, with natural gas, condensate and crude oil, and coal accounting for 67% of total energy production.

wind-turbines thailand business news

2017 has been a positive year for renewable energy throughout the Asia Pacific, with the price and cost of power declining throughout the region.  This is due to the decline in tariffs and the price of generating equipment.

By the year 2040, there will be US$10.2 trillion invested in new power generation capacity worldwide, of which US$4.8 trillion will be in Asia.  In Asia, one-third of this investment will be in wind power, one-third in solar, with 18% going to nuclear and 10% to coal and gas.

This is incredible feedback. Eyekandi-Solar has now jumped on board in order to supply the best solar installation service to the Thai region.

 

11
Dec

Enerray to build one of the biggest roof-top PV systems in Thailand

Enerray is a solar power company, leader in the design, construction and management of medium and large photovoltaic systems, both for third-party systems and proprietary systems.

Enerray UAC Thailand

Surat Thani roof top array by Enerray UAC Thailand

Surat Thani roof top array by Enerray UAC Thailand

Enerray-UAC Thailand (UAC.SET) will be building one of the largest roof-top photovoltaic systems in Thailand, with a total capacity of 2.5 MWp, enough to meet the annual energy needs of 1,400 Thai households and avoiding the emission of around 1,800 tonnes of CO2 into the atmosphere, providing an estimated annual output of 3,500,000 kWh of clean energy.

Enerray UAC Thailand has already built and connected different roof-top photovoltaic systems, therefore contributing to the development and expansion of renewable energy in the country.

Enerray UAC was established last year as a joint venture between Enerray S.p.A.,the Italian company,  a subsidiary of the Maccaferri Industrial Group, and UAC Global Public Company Limited, a Thai listed company. The purpose of this subsidiary is to apply the outstanding technologies services and procedures to the Asian market.

Read further to find out about the expanding Solar industry in Thailand by Enerray and how Eyekandi-Solar is assisting in the process.

08
Dec

Solar Prospects are Bright in Thailand

Solar prospects are becoming brighter, despite the dim policy. Declining costs and other incentives are proving to be beneficial to the renewable energy sector.

Workers install solar panels on a house, which can help residents cut down on their electricity bills. WEERABOON WISARTSAKUL

Workers install solar panels on a house, which can help residents cut down on their electricity bills. WEERABOON WISARTSAKUL

With the cost of installing solar rooftops dropping substantially and energy firms offering several types of business models to encourage consumers, home and building owners are taking advantage of the clean power source, even as energy policymakers have not yet finalised regulations to let private solar rooftop owners sell power to state utilities.

Owners of factories, buildings and residences have installed solar rooftops to produce their own power and cut back on expenses.

With falling development costs, the break-even period for those who have invested in solar power has shortened from 15 years in 2012 to eight years in 2016 to five years now, said Prof Dusit Kruangam, chairman of the Thai Photovoltaic Industries Association.

The current trend should make renewable energy a viable competitor with fossil fuels within a decade.

This price decrease has a huge impact in the solar industry. Eyekandi-Solar is right behind you to offer the best service and solar installation in Thailand.

Click here to contact us for a quote, and read this article further to find out more.

01
Dec

Thailand over achieving their Solar Goals, 2017

Thailand has so far been the leader in developing solar power in Southeast Asia, with one of the government officials saying its installed capacity reached about 2 GW in August, beating the target of 1.7 GW for this year.

“We have already exceeded our target for this year, especially in solar and waste power, given attractive FIT (feed in tariff) rates,” Viraphol Jirapraditkul, director of the Energy Regulatory Commission told Reuters.

“We have discussed about the possibility of raising the target for renewables and the energy ministry’s planning office will need to propose the numbers.”

Malaysia has planned to add 1 GW of solar power capacity by the year 2020 said Energy, Green Technology and Water Minister Maximus Ongkili, up from 267 MW currently.

The Philippines has met a previous target of 500 MW for solar, but no fresh target has been set as the country’s new government is still reviewing the various energy sources.

Some analysts cautioned that Indonesia and Vietnam’s solar targets were ambitious and could be difficult to achieve.

Despite the growth of solar power in the region, coal is likely to remain a major source of energy as fast-growing demand means that Southeast Asia needs to double its power generation capacity in the next decade, government and industry officials said.

Read the full Reuters article here, where it explains the growing solar industry in Indonesia and Vietnam.

An employee of PT Perusahaan Listrik Negara (PLN) cleans the surface of solar panels at a solar power generation plant in Gili Meno island  photo taken by Antara Foto

An employee of PT Perusahaan Listrik Negara (PLN) cleans the surface of solar panels at a solar power generation plant in Gili Meno island
photo taken by Antara Foto

25
Oct

Thailand goes hybrid while prices hit Malaysian solar

A great overview of the ASEAN region’s solar status was given by Franck Constant, president of Constant Energy, when an interview took place between him at PV Tech.

A lot of excitement is in the air as the approach of the Solar and Off-Grid Renewables Southeast Asia conference in Bangkok, next month.

Thailand

The rooftop corporate PPA market is the solar sector which has the most recent development. “The solar equipment and EPC prices have gone down to a point now where, with average electricity prices and the level of irradiance, you can actually offer savings to Thai industries by selling them solar power during the day.”

Thailand large-scale solar

A hybrid programme is in the mix for next year, 2018, which will involve batteries.  “For this programme you can get projects with a PPA as long as your power is produced by a renewable source, such as solar, biomass or wind, and you are able to maintain a fixed output during the day.”

The largest impact on solar in the ASEAN region over the last 12 months

The item on the top of the list is the sudden price increase of Chinese solar panels.

The Indian market was burned by the price increases and probably suffered the most, but in Southeast Asia it is most likely to affect the Malaysian market because they have a lot of capacity, up to 500MW, due to come online by a June deadline.

To read the full interview, click here.

16
Oct

Are you going to the ASIA CLEAN ENERGY SUMMIT 2017?

If you’re going to, or thinking of going to the Asia Clean energy Summit toward the end of this month, have a read about what you’re going to be witnessing…

Asia Clean Energy Summit 2017

Asia Clean Energy Summit 2017

Asia Clean Energy Summit (ACES) is Asia’s leading event focusing on clean energy technology, policy and finance supported by leading government agencies, research institutes and industry in Singapore. ACES provide a common platform for regional thought leaders in both the public and private sector to collaborate on critical issues and opportunities in harnessing clean energy for the future. As the regional platform to share and co-create innovative clean energy solutions, ACES supports the vision to be a clean energy hub for Asia.

ACES exhibition creates a marketplace for companies to showcase latest technologies solutions.

The PV Asia provides a great platform for the world’s PV experts and scientists to showcase and share the latest developments in solar energy technologies.

The PV Asia Scientific Conference provides an excellent platform for scientists and engineers to showcase their latest developments in solar PV technologies. The conference programme encompasses topics which include novel PV concepts, thin-film technologies, crystalline silicon materials and solar cells, PV module technologies, PV module quality assurance, PV systems, smart grids, and PV characterisation methods.

The RE Asia Conference brings together academics, researchers, professional engineers, government policy makers, and business professionals from the domains of Renewable Energy Integration, Offshore Renewable Energy; Micro-grids, Smart Grids & Energy Storage; and Grid Interactions of Electromobility.

The second Asian Conference on Energy, Power and Transportation Electrification (ACEPT) will cooperate with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics (IEEE) to bring together the world leading experts to present emerging topics on energy, power, and transportation electrification.For more information, please visit http://acept.asia.

All this and more is found on the Asia Clean Energy Summit 2017 website, so click here to read more and register.

logo-re-asia    logo-pv-asia

26
Sep

Households allowed to sell power?

Word is out that by the end of the year, the so called ‘restriction on households and commercial buildings selling power generated by their solar rooftops to state utilities’ will be deregulated, and will be allowed to start selling their power to the grid! Great news!

According to the Thai Energy Ministry, the buying rate will be fixed at below 2.6 baht per kilowatt-hour.

At present, private actors are allowed to sell power to EGAT (Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand) through auctions under the small power producer (SPP) or very small power producer (VSPP) project.

A solar panel installed on a commercial building in Nakhon Ratchasima province. New rules will open the door for detached houses, warehouses, factories and offices to sell their leftover solar power.

A solar panel installed on a commercial building in Nakhon Ratchasima province. New rules will open the door for detached houses, warehouses, factories and offices to sell their leftover solar power.

ERI researcher Sopitsuda Tongsopit said solar rooftops are expected to have a minimal effect on state utilities in generating backup power, as total power-generating capacity for solar remains small compared with the overall amount of electricity in the country’s power supply system. Thailand has 2,990 megawatts of solar power installed. Some 2,960MW, as of July, is from solar farms, while an additional 130MW is from rooftops.

Click here to view the original Bangkok Post article spreading this great news…

20
Sep

Solar Future is still BRIGHT

Although the government has not yet sent a clear signal for when it will start buying solar power generated from private buildings and households, the boom in solar rooftops in that segment has started, say industry officials.

Solar panels are seen on the rooftops of Thammasat University, among the organisations that have installed the solar system to generate their own power.

Solar panels are seen on the rooftops of Thammasat University, among the organisations that have installed the solar system to generate their own power.

With the cost of installing solar on rooftops having dropped by 50%, there has been a steady increase in the amount of businesses, households and institutions wanting to generate their own power. This is despite the fact the the government still does not allow you to sell your self-generated power back to the grid.

Two SET-listed energy firms are offering new purchasing models to help residents afford their own solar rooftops, allowing several payment types including hire-purchase, similar to auto leasing companies.

Solar power generation in Thailand has reached 2,990 megawatts, of which 2,860MW is from solar farms and 130MW from solar rooftop installations at households and businesses.

Energy policymakers are expected to finalise the process to deregulate solar rooftops and allow residents to sell power back to state utilities by the end of this year.

PTT Plc, the national oil and gas conglomerate, is also looking to get in on the action, as it has installed solar rooftops at 10 petrol stations via a joint effort with its power and utilities subsidiary Global Power Synergy Plc.

It is awesome to hear that oil and gas companies are also doing their part for the benefit of the environment.

 

17
Sep

SEEKING SUSTAINABLE SOLAR POWER FOR URBAN THAILAND 4.0

This article is written by journalist, Dana Blouin, she is a correspondent journalist for the KhaosodEnglish.com news website. Dana went to a few expos in Thailand to find out about the various issues which unfold in the solar industry, specifically in tropical regions.

To find out even more about the issues which the solar industry faces, Dana spoke to assistant professor Siriroj Sirisukprasert, a power systems expert from the department of Electrical Engineering and Faculty of Engineering at Kasetsart University.

An electric tuk tuk seen here last month during the annual Techsauce Summit in Bangkok.

An electric tuk tuk seen here last month during the annual Techsauce Summit in Bangkok.

“In a tropical country such as Thailand, raising temperature at photovoltaic, or PV, panels play important role to their efficiency reduction. Temperature coefficient of maximum power is what you need to look for. Generally, PV panels are rated at Standard Test Conditions of 25 degrees,” he said. “The difference between the operating temperature and 25 degrees will tell you how low the maximum power will go. In Thailand, a 30 degree difference can be easily seen. That means a 12 to 15 percent reduction from its maximum power. To handle this concern, appropriated PV ventilation is needed.“

To simplify, most PVs are rated for 25 degrees, but in Thailand those operating temperatures can be significantly higher and that causes the panels to produce less electricity. Siriroj concluded by saying that “appropriate ventilation is needed”.

Ventilation is another one of the major challenges urban solar installations face. It’s much easier to get airflow around a valley full of panels when you can mount them as high away from the ground as needed, on a building, that is not an option in most cases.

“Thailand is already leading the region is solar capacity – and that’s fantastic. I hope to see the trend continue and to see it include urban solar projects that look to add both capacity and stability to grids as well as the economy,” Dana commented.

Read More here…

14
Sep

Philippines: President Duterte inaugurates expanded 800MW Philippines solar module factory

‘Filipino president Rodrigo Duterte, on August 23rd, inaugurated the Philippines first solar module manufacturing facility with an expanded capacity of 800MW at Santo Tomas, Batangas, owned by renewable energy firm Solar Philippines.

Solar Philippines launched the factory as a 200MW plant in March and has since then expanded the facility to 800MW.

Leandro Leviste, founder and CEO of Solar Phippines, told PV Tech that the company already has three OEM agreements with Chinese companies for manufacturing and exporting the majority of the panels to both the US and Europe.

Solar Philippines CEO Leandro Leviste presents a “Duterte Edition” solar panel to President Rodrigo Duterte. Also on stage are DOE Secretary Alfonso Cusi, PEZA Director General Charito Plaza, and Solar Philippines COO Roy Oyco. Credit: Solar Philippines

Solar Philippines CEO Leandro Leviste presents a “Duterte Edition” solar panel to President Rodrigo Duterte. Also on stage are DOE Secretary Alfonso Cusi, PEZA Director General Charito Plaza, and Solar Philippines COO Roy Oyco. Credit: Solar Philippines

In both these markets there are existing tariffs against imports directly from China.

The firm entered the PV manufacturing space following the closing of two factories run by US firm SunPower in the Philippines. Back in March a company spokesperson told PV Tech that the factory is managed and staffed by the former team of SunPower Philippines.

Earlier this year, the firm started construction on the first utility-scale solar project to be combined with battery energy storage in the Philippines, with 150MW of PV and a 50MWh battery at Concepcion, Tarlac, using modules from the Batangas factory. Commisioning is due in the next few months.

Leviste added that the firm is working on an off-grid 8MWh energy storage project combined with 4MW of solar in the island Mindoro. This solar, diesel and battery micro-grid project will be able to power a whole town and again Leviste believes it will be the largest such project in Asia.

Leviste said the firm is set to install 200MW of solar PV this year, followed by 500MW in 2018, at tariffs as low as US$0.058/kWh, which he claimed could be the lowest in the region. The firm also recently submitted proposals to the country’s utilities for the replacing of plans for large capacities of traditional power generation with 5GW of solar.

In a release, Leviste said: “Filipinos can save 30% on electricity. The average family paying 3,000 pesos will see their bill decrease to 2,000 pesos a month, and now with the latest batteries, entire towns can use solar energy for 24-hours a day.”

 

Click here to see more of this article, and information about improved Solar Tech coming from the Philippines!