Tag: solar farm

30
Jul

Opportunities in the Thai Solar Energy sector

A significant increase in Thai Solar Energy since 2010 has seen a climb from almost nothing to a total of 3 GW of solar installations in the country! This already satisfies half of their target for the year 2036… 

There have been seven opportunties outlined by the prestigious International Lawyers. Pugnatorius which we have inlcuded below. To see the original article written by Praktikantin, click here.

Image supplied by PV Tech Thai Solar Energy

Image supplied by PV Tech
Thai Solar Energy

seven opportunites

  1. New solar tenders: There will be new public tender procedures to develop more solar farms in Thailand. It can be expected that the bidding processes in 2018 will have more strict regulatory requirements concerning the location, capacity, PPA conditions, and overall feasibility of the tenders.

  2.  Off-market solar farms: Many solar energy projects are realized off-market and outside of a formal public tender process. Foreign investors will need a close connection and cooperation with a Thai partner and may have to adjust their business policies to local standards. Keeping the projects local have an advantage for the Thai economy!

  3. Acquisition of existing solar farms: During the last few years there was a flourishing trade of electricity production licenses and power purchase agreements, several semi-finished or already established and electricity producing solar farms are now for sale. These projects can be acquired through an asset acquisition or the transfer of the shares in the solar farm company.

  4. Utilization of own rooftops: As a cost-effective way to leverage solar energy, commercial and industrial property owners are allowed to install solar panels onto their own roofs and to produce electricity “behind-the-meter” for self-consumption. See one of Eyekandi-Solar’s previous post. Such investment can be delivered, financed and maintained by third parties under EPC (Engineering, Procurement, and Construction), O&M (Operating & Maintenance) and finance agreements.

  5. Solar rooftop investments: Under Thailand’s upcoming solar rooftop legislation, (foreign) investors and developers are (hopefully) allowed (i) to cooperate with commercial and industrial rooftop owners, (ii) to generate electricity, (iii) to sell the electricity to the grid (net metering) and (iv) to enter into power purchase agreements with commercial and industrial parties (C&I PPA).

  6. Floating solar farms: As the Third Way, the development of floating solar arrays (floatovoltaics) should be the next big thing. New projects are available and provide for an attractive return on investment, independently from the pending rooftop legislation. Details can be found at “Floating solar farms in Thailand“. Eyekandi-Solar recently wrote about the floating solar farm in Rayong, see article here.

  7.  Internet of (Solar) Energy: Internet of Energy (IoE) means the implementation of Internet of Things (IoT) technology with distributed energy systems to optimize the efficiency of the generation, transmission, and utilization of electricity. As soon as Thailand and its regulatory framework are ready for a peer-to-peer energy trading community, every person can trade their energy directly, using a blockchain technology without any middleman. Are you familiar with SolarCoin?

    Solar coin

Are there any opportunities which they may have missed, that you feel are important to highlight? Get in touch with us and let us know.

19
Jun

Thai Solar Pioneer, Inspiring Women Across Thailand

Inspiring story about a local Thai business woman and entrepreneur

Well known local Thai business woman and entrepreneur, Wandee Khunchornyakong Juljarern, has been interested in the solar industry for more than a decade. With experience in off grid installations, she continued to get rejected from banks and investors to fund her Solar Farm initiative. The excuses ranged from her age, to lack of experience in ‘commercial solar projects’.

“The more people say, ‘You should not try it, you should not take a risk,’ the more I want to do it,” Wandee said in an interview. Her goal was to prove Thailand could use solar energy, so that “we can change the form of energy production, instead of relying on only conventional means”.

Finally the Thai government announced permits for solar power plants that could feed into the grid,  and Wandee Khunchornyakong Juljarern was the first in line.

Kasikornbank, the 10th Bank she visited for assistance, whose president was also an engineer, showed interest in her initiative, and agreed to fund only 60% of her $20 million request. For the remaining 40%, she sold some of her family land she had inherited…

“My mum said, ‘Do what pleases you.’ My husband said, ‘Let me think for three days’,” she recalled. Her response was that she would sell it anyway, she said, roaring with laughter.

Wandee Khunchornyakong Juljarern’s first solar farm opened in April 2010 in Korat, in the northeast of Thailand.

4 years later, Wandee’s Solar Power Company Group (SPCG) had 36 solar PV plants with a capacity of 250 megawatts.

SPCG is now one of Thailand’s largest solar companies. Between 2013 and 2016, its revenues more than doubled.

As chairman and CEO of the listed company, Wandee has been recognized by the United Nations for her commitment to clean energy, and in 2015 Forbes dubbed her one of Asia’s most powerful women.

“We are helping the world by reducing CO2 (emissions) by almost 200,000 tonnes equivalent per year,” said Wandee. This amounts to taking more than 40,000 cars off the road, according to statistics provided by the World Bank.

Solar Farms and Solar rooftops, Thailand Image supplied by SPCG Thailand

Solar Farms and Solar rooftops, Thailand
Image supplied by SPCG Thailand

Moving the Solar streak forward

Wandee is planning to venture into Myanmar, where millions of people lack access to electricity, but realises the difficulty of implementation in a nation without national policy on renewable energy.

Talking of the Success in Thailand…

“I would call Korat almost every hour asking, ‘What’s happening? You have enough sun? How many kilowatt hours?’” she said, chuckling in the modern building now housing the company in a fashionable part of Bangkok, with soothing green walls and images of a lush forest on the glass doors and walls.

Luckily, the project outperformed expectations and within three months, she was looking for more investors.

The International Finance Corporation, the World Bank’s private-sector division, and the multilateral Clean Technology Fund gave early financial backing.

Wandee, who humbly still lives in her old house, wants to continue working and pursuing her Solar dreams, despite her age.

“Women… have to have confidence in (themselves),” she said.

Original reporting by Thin Lei Win, and editing by Megan Rowling. Credit for the content of this article goes to the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women’s rights, corruption and climate change. Visit this link for more.

05
Apr

Floating Solar Farm in Rayong and China

A giant pond inside SCG Chemicals’ plant at Rayong’s Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate was originally developed to deal with a water shortage crisis that tarnished their production about 10 years ago. The 20-rai pond (3.2 hectares), equivalent to about 10 football fields, has become an experimental site and the country’s first floating solar farm.
For visitors and viewers like us, it looks like a floating mirror in a dam. Almost half of it has been covered with about 3,400 photovoltaic cells to convert the sun’s energy into power. These cells stand on a special pontoon the company specifically built.

A floating solar farm is shown at a pond at SCG Chemicals plant in Rayong's Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate. (Photo courtesy SCG Chemicals)

A floating solar farm is shown at a pond at SCG Chemicals plant in Rayong’s Map Ta Phut Industrial Estate. (Photo courtesy SCG Chemicals)

The largest floating solar farm in the world is in the Chinese city of Huainan. It has been built on top of a former coal mine, which had become a lake after being flooded with groundwater. The 40-megawatt power plant consists of 120,000 solar panels covering an area of more than 160 football fields. The $45-million investment could help power 15,000 homes in China.

If you’re interested in having a look at the drone footage of the largest floating solar farm in the world, watch the clip!

Solar is an increasing industry, especially in Asia, and to see innovations like these, it gives us hope that it will only be rising in the coming years.

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