Tag: solar energy

14
Sep

The use of Solar and the Blockchain in Southeast Asia Startup BitLumens

Using blockchain and solar energy, UN- and World Bank-endorsed startup company, BitLumens has been tooling its solar home technology to bring electricity and financial inclusion to underserved populations. Myanmar and Indonesia are BitLumens’s first Southeast Asia stops.

Founding CEO Veronica Garcia spoke with Southeast Asia Globe about their plans to lease solar systems to power off-the-grid households, and we (Eyekandi-Solar) decided to share the interview with you.

Tell us a bit about BitLumens…
We’re bringing solar home systems and mini-grid into off-grid communities – so these are communities that are not connected to the power lines. We have some sensors added into these [leased solar power] machines that collect information from each use… such as power generation, power consumption and also carbon mitigation… Before we install these devices, our agents collect KYC, or know-your-customer data, on each of the users, so we would collect things like how many people are within that household, what are their wages, what type of floor do they have… All of this information goes into the blockchain – this KYC combined with the transaction data. These people pay for the devices every month, and… [we] give a [score based on their payment history] so that at the end of the payment period, they will have a credit score, which works as a financial identity where they could either open a bank account or they could have access to a micro loan that would be backed by BLS [BitLumens] tokens.

Are the BLS coins environmentally friendly to mine?
Yes, of course. We use Ethereum [blockchain], and Ethereum uses proof of stake that uses way less energy consumption [to mine than] Bitcoin. As you know, Bitcoin takes around 40 terawatt hours to operate. We don’t accept Bitcoins in the first place because we don’t think it’s very environmentally friendly. We try to stay in protocols that need less computational power.

BitLumens combines blockchain technology and solar energy to bring electricity to those not connected to the main grid Image supplied by SEA-Globe

BitLumens combines blockchain technology and solar energy to bring electricity to those not connected to the main grid
Image supplied by SEA-Globe

Why is BitLumens important to countries like Myanmar and Indonesia?
I do anticipate a decentralised energy system in these types of regions where the power lines cannot reach small communities. In these regions, 1 kilometre of power lines costs around half a million dollars. If you need to run, let’s say, 100 kilometres of power lines until you reach a community of 2,000 users, there is no way that the utility company will do that. However, if you collect the data and tell them this is how much we generate, this is how much they consume and this is how much they pay, things are totally different and one would be able to find partnerships where one could place [solar home] mini-grids. 

Do you have future plans for expansion in other parts of Southeast Asia?
Yes, Indonesia is also an important market for us. We are looking at places like Nosatangara, this is at the southernmost part of Indonesia. There are thousands of people who are not connected to a grid, so we are looking at a place where we could actually place a pilot there… We have partnered with a really good organisation there and the UN was really good to set up all of these connections for us, so we are happy to be announcing that pretty soon… and then we will immediately start the deployment.

More information about BitLumens can be found here, and the original article published by SEA-Globe can be found here.

30
Jul

Opportunities in the Thai Solar Energy sector

A significant increase in Thai Solar Energy since 2010 has seen a climb from almost nothing to a total of 3 GW of solar installations in the country! This already satisfies half of their target for the year 2036… 

There have been seven opportunties outlined by the prestigious International Lawyers. Pugnatorius which we have inlcuded below. To see the original article written by Praktikantin, click here.

Image supplied by PV Tech Thai Solar Energy

Image supplied by PV Tech
Thai Solar Energy

seven opportunites

  1. New solar tenders: There will be new public tender procedures to develop more solar farms in Thailand. It can be expected that the bidding processes in 2018 will have more strict regulatory requirements concerning the location, capacity, PPA conditions, and overall feasibility of the tenders.

  2.  Off-market solar farms: Many solar energy projects are realized off-market and outside of a formal public tender process. Foreign investors will need a close connection and cooperation with a Thai partner and may have to adjust their business policies to local standards. Keeping the projects local have an advantage for the Thai economy!

  3. Acquisition of existing solar farms: During the last few years there was a flourishing trade of electricity production licenses and power purchase agreements, several semi-finished or already established and electricity producing solar farms are now for sale. These projects can be acquired through an asset acquisition or the transfer of the shares in the solar farm company.

  4. Utilization of own rooftops: As a cost-effective way to leverage solar energy, commercial and industrial property owners are allowed to install solar panels onto their own roofs and to produce electricity “behind-the-meter” for self-consumption. See one of Eyekandi-Solar’s previous post. Such investment can be delivered, financed and maintained by third parties under EPC (Engineering, Procurement, and Construction), O&M (Operating & Maintenance) and finance agreements.

  5. Solar rooftop investments: Under Thailand’s upcoming solar rooftop legislation, (foreign) investors and developers are (hopefully) allowed (i) to cooperate with commercial and industrial rooftop owners, (ii) to generate electricity, (iii) to sell the electricity to the grid (net metering) and (iv) to enter into power purchase agreements with commercial and industrial parties (C&I PPA).

  6. Floating solar farms: As the Third Way, the development of floating solar arrays (floatovoltaics) should be the next big thing. New projects are available and provide for an attractive return on investment, independently from the pending rooftop legislation. Details can be found at “Floating solar farms in Thailand“. Eyekandi-Solar recently wrote about the floating solar farm in Rayong, see article here.

  7.  Internet of (Solar) Energy: Internet of Energy (IoE) means the implementation of Internet of Things (IoT) technology with distributed energy systems to optimize the efficiency of the generation, transmission, and utilization of electricity. As soon as Thailand and its regulatory framework are ready for a peer-to-peer energy trading community, every person can trade their energy directly, using a blockchain technology without any middleman. Are you familiar with SolarCoin?

    Solar coin

Are there any opportunities which they may have missed, that you feel are important to highlight? Get in touch with us and let us know.

07
May

Delta Considers Storage Options, Asia

Delta, expanding their horizons

Delta Electronics Thailand is a maker and distributor of power management solutions and electronic components. The company is currently undergoing studies in the feasibility of an energy storage business in response to the global popularity of electric energy. Storage of which comes with it, hand in hand.

It has been confirmed that Delta will team up with the PTT Group and the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) to invest in energy storage in future.

“Our feasibility study is for the energy storage business and the future market, both locally and overseas,” Kittisak Ngoenngokngam, business director for Southeast Asia, said.

“Delta expects this collaboration to be concluded soon.”

Curtis Ku (front), senior business director of Delta, takes Yossapong Laoonual, president of the Electric Vehicle Association of Thailand, to visit Delta's solar rooftop in Bangpoo Industrial Estate. THITI WANNAMONTHA   Bangkok Post

Curtis Ku (front), senior business director of Delta, takes Yossapong Laoonual, president of the Electric Vehicle Association of Thailand, to visit Delta’s solar rooftop in Bangpoo Industrial Estate. THITI WANNAMONTHA
Bangkok Post

Mr Kittisak said that ‘Delta will install trial energy storage of 500 kilowatt-hours at its plant in the Bangpoo Industrial Estate in the third quarter’.

He further said that ‘energy storage will be included in Delta’s business segment of infrastructure together with its solar-panel inverter and charging station for electric vehicles (EVs)’.

Delta has recently provided a 2MW solar rooftop at the Bang Poo plant which supplies ‘quick charges of 25-50 kilowatts (KW)’.

Hsieh Shen-yen, Delta’s president, said that the renewable energy business and energy-saving solutions are a growing global trend. Delta is continuously searching for new opportunities to grow and invest in those business, mainly in the form of mergers and acquisitions in order to keep up with the public demand.

Delta expects 2018 revenue growth of 10% to 50 billion baht, thanks to demand growth for products globally, especially in Asean and India.

Last year, the company posted revenue of 49.3 billion baht, up 5.1%, though net profit fell by 10.6% to 4.9 billion baht.

21
Dec

Schneider Electric to go 100% renewable by 2030

Eyekandi-Solar supports Schneider Electric in the decision to become 100% renewable by 2030.

“The French energy management and automation company plans to use on-site projects, contracted off-site projects and clean energy credits to meet its new 100% goal.”

As there is an increase in the movement towards powering the world with renewable energy, it’s incredible that large corporations are now spearheading this movement.

The French energy management and automation company Schneider Electric announced recently that it would join the ranks of the tech giants Google, Facebook, Microsoft and Amazon, and strive to power 100% of its global operations with renewable energy by 2030.

schneider_electric_building_latam

Schneider Electric already has rooftop solar in place at facilities in India, Thailand and its headquarters in France. However, the company notes that even as it plans to add more rooftop PV, this will only meet a portion of its total demand.

“Schneider Electric strives to answer the world’s new energy challenge by boosting energy efficiency everywhere: in homes, buildings and cities, industry, the grid, and throughout remote communities,” reads a press statement by the company. “In a world more decarbonized, more digitized, and more decentralized, energy use needs to be more productive.”

Click here to get a quote from Eyekandi-Solar, so you can also jump on the renewable energy bandwagon!

14
Dec

Wind, Solar and Renewable projects on the Climb in Thailand

A recent report by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) and the Thai ministry of energy found that renewable energy could account for 37% of the country’s electricity by 2036.

Currently, around 18% of Thailand’s power is generated from renewable sources. The bulk is generated from fossil fuel products, with natural gas, condensate and crude oil, and coal accounting for 67% of total energy production.

wind-turbines thailand business news

2017 has been a positive year for renewable energy throughout the Asia Pacific, with the price and cost of power declining throughout the region.  This is due to the decline in tariffs and the price of generating equipment.

By the year 2040, there will be US$10.2 trillion invested in new power generation capacity worldwide, of which US$4.8 trillion will be in Asia.  In Asia, one-third of this investment will be in wind power, one-third in solar, with 18% going to nuclear and 10% to coal and gas.

This is incredible feedback. Eyekandi-Solar has now jumped on board in order to supply the best solar installation service to the Thai region.

 

26
Jul

Power bill is going up – time to invest in solar

“The monthly electricity bill during the September-December period this year is expected to rise by 2.5% to an average of 3.59 baht per kilowatt hour, up from 3.50 baht per unit, because of the rising fuel… “

Power bill is going up - time to invest in solar 2

A power pole is being repaired on Bamrung Muang Road in Bangkok. Monthly electricity bill for the September-December period is expected to rise to 3.59 baht per unit. APICHART JINAKUL

The cost of solar in Thailand, and globally has been on the steady decline over the past couple of years. The installation cost of solar panels has decreased from approximately $8 USD per Watt in 2010 to less than $4 USD per Watt in 2017. While the total installed price of solar has continued to decline, the price of the solar panels or modules themselves has remained relatively flat since 2012, indicating a decline in non-module costs.

Power bill is going up - time to invest in solar 3

Yes it is true, electricity from the grid in Thailand is still the cheaper option. But how sustainable is it? As soon as you make the investment into Solar, the more you’ll stop losing, and the more you will gain.

Click here to view the Previous article ‘Something is coming, check out this press release from Japanese company Kyocera’

Read the below article which explains the price increases of the power bills for residential use, and you might see a need to make the investment sooner rather than later…

Power bills to rise 9 satang a unit as fuel tariff hikes

Timeline of solar cells – Wikipedia

The Price of Solar Is Declining to Unprecedented Lows