Tag: renewable energy

07
May

Delta Considers Storage Options, Asia

Delta, expanding their horizons

Delta Electronics Thailand is a maker and distributor of power management solutions and electronic components. The company is currently undergoing studies in the feasibility of an energy storage business in response to the global popularity of electric energy. Storage of which comes with it, hand in hand.

It has been confirmed that Delta will team up with the PTT Group and the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) to invest in energy storage in future.

“Our feasibility study is for the energy storage business and the future market, both locally and overseas,” Kittisak Ngoenngokngam, business director for Southeast Asia, said.

“Delta expects this collaboration to be concluded soon.”

Curtis Ku (front), senior business director of Delta, takes Yossapong Laoonual, president of the Electric Vehicle Association of Thailand, to visit Delta's solar rooftop in Bangpoo Industrial Estate. THITI WANNAMONTHA   Bangkok Post

Curtis Ku (front), senior business director of Delta, takes Yossapong Laoonual, president of the Electric Vehicle Association of Thailand, to visit Delta’s solar rooftop in Bangpoo Industrial Estate. THITI WANNAMONTHA
Bangkok Post

Mr Kittisak said that ‘Delta will install trial energy storage of 500 kilowatt-hours at its plant in the Bangpoo Industrial Estate in the third quarter’.

He further said that ‘energy storage will be included in Delta’s business segment of infrastructure together with its solar-panel inverter and charging station for electric vehicles (EVs)’.

Delta has recently provided a 2MW solar rooftop at the Bang Poo plant which supplies ‘quick charges of 25-50 kilowatts (KW)’.

Hsieh Shen-yen, Delta’s president, said that the renewable energy business and energy-saving solutions are a growing global trend. Delta is continuously searching for new opportunities to grow and invest in those business, mainly in the form of mergers and acquisitions in order to keep up with the public demand.

Delta expects 2018 revenue growth of 10% to 50 billion baht, thanks to demand growth for products globally, especially in Asean and India.

Last year, the company posted revenue of 49.3 billion baht, up 5.1%, though net profit fell by 10.6% to 4.9 billion baht.

30
Apr

TSE and the future of Renewable Power Plants

Are Renewable Energy Plants still viable in todays age?

Thai Solar Energy Plc (TSE), believes that “the potential for renewable power plants in Thailand has become unfavourable after energy policymakers have put off plans to buy power generated from renewables for five years.”

Policymakers have further announced that new renewable power producers will equate the feed-in tariff as fossil-fuel power producers, at about 2.40 baht per kilowatt-hour, as their production cost is equal to or lower than their traditional counterparts.

Cathleen Maleenont, TSE’s chairman and chief executive has said that, “The country has no potential to operate a renewable power plant and sell electricity to state utilities because profits will decline under the new rate.”

Some renewable investors operate under a power purchase agreement with the EGAT and Metropolitan Electricity Authority under a business-to-government (B2G) model.  But Ms Maleenont said that “Selling power in the business-to-business (B2B) segment remains of interest to renewable investors because both parties can negotiate on prices and terms.”

“We can invest in renewable power plants in the country for B2B purposes, but there is less business opportunity in the B2G segment,” she said. “For our overseas outlook, TSE is very keen on operating renewable power plants because other governments still offer a high adder rate.”

A TSE-built solar rooftop project in Nakhon Ratchasima. The company is looking to expand its business to provide renewable energy to other countries.  Image supplied by the Bangkok Post

A TSE-built solar rooftop project in Nakhon Ratchasima. The company is looking to expand its business to provide renewable energy to other countries.
Image supplied by the Bangkok Post

TSE Solar plants in Japan

Ms Maleenont said that TSE Overseas Group is in charge of 8 solar power plants across Japan with a total capacity of 176.72 megawatts.

5 of these solar power plants, with a combined capacity of 6.99MW, have already secured income with a feed-in tariff of ¥36 yen (10.41 baht) per kilowatt-hour to sell electricity to Japan’s state utilities on a 20-year long contract.

What do you think about this, and the fact that TSE have said that there has been a decline in renewables? Do we want to set good examples of using renewable and green energy, or do we still want to be consuming and using fossil fuels?

We believe in the future of renewable and solar energy power generation.

Lets us know at Eyekandi-Solar, we’re interested in what you think!

20
Apr

Thai Energy Companies Expand Across Southeast Asia

Thailand’s increase in Energy Usage

Through the technology practices taking place inside individual homes in Southeast Asia, startups including Solar and Wind companies, are expanding dramatically.

For twenty years, the Thai government have implemented renewable energy policies in support of this green tech, of which the country is now reaping the benefits. Oil and Gas Companies are also now profiting after recovering from a three-year slump, increasing electricity demand due to economic growth, and renewable technologies that have finally become competitive against fossil fuels.

Long-standing reform policies have turned Thailand’s state energy company PTT into a successful international oil and gas producer, they have encouraged the development of power producers such as Electricity Generating, and fostered the emergence of renewable energy start-up companies such as Energy Absolute.

“The power businesses in Thailand have developed expertise in this sector, and are now well placed to support energy development across the region,” said Robert Grant, Asia Pacific head at Canadian-listed SNC-Lavalin, a company focused on energy, infrastructure and mining.

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) members have a combined population of more than 600 million people, with an approximate collective GDP of $3 trillion.

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), ASEAN’s energy use rose by 60 % in the last 15 years, which portrays that the region’s demand could grow another 66% by the year 2040.

“You can already see increased activity by Thai investors in the ASEAN region,” Grant said.

The expansion has been reflected in the local stock exchange, with shares of energy companies growing nearly 75% since the start of 2016, against a broader market gain of less than half that.

It’s also sparked a mass broadcast of listings, with Thai power companies having raised more than $2 billion from initial public offerings (IPOs) in 2016 and 2017.

An ‘Ecosystem for Growth’ 

Government policy “created an ecosystem for growth for Thai energy companies,” said Maria Lapiz, head of institutional research at Maybank Kim Eng Securities, with the first reforms coming in the 1990s.

That was the time when the Thai government began allowing small power generators (1-90 megawatts) to sell their power back to the national grid. Thailand was also an earlier adopter of natural gas, which now generates about 60% of the country’s electricity.

‘In 2012, Thailand was one of Asia’s first countries to introduce “feed-in” tariffs to give solar developers additional payments on top of normal prices when selling electricity to utilities, channeling investment into the sector.’

Similar tariffs have been applied to other renewable power sources, including wind, small-scale hydro, biomass and biogas.

The privatization of PTT was another big boost to the energy sector. “PTT was privatized in 2001, which helped drive growth in the energy sector from E&P to refiners and helped in the development of the Thai capital market,” said Lapiz.

According to the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), Thailand is the first Southeast Asian country to be one of the top 15 solar power generators, in the world.

Early Birds in the Renewable Sector

“Thailand started development in renewable power much earlier than regional peers,” said Thidasiri Srisamith, Chief Investment Officer of Kasikorn Asset Management.

Because of the early start and positive relationships with neighbouring countries, Thailand is “a leader in Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam, and will continue to expand into these countries,” she said.

Thailand’s largest solar company Superblock, has plans to grow, with a $1.8 billion  wind farm investment in Vietnam.

Thailand’s biggest wind power generator, Wind Energy Holdings, plans to start investing in solar, hydro and biomass to back up its capacity, not just in Thailand, but also in Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Bangladesh and Australia.

“Going forward, Thai power company growth will depend on the ability to secure capacity and have a steady stream of projects … which (are) increasingly coming from overseas,” said Kasikorn’s Thidasiri.

18
Apr

Thai Minister Announces Increase in Coal

Diversify the source of Fuel for Power

The Thai Energy Minister, Siri Jirapongphan, has recently announced that Thailand is expected to increase the mix of electricity generated by coal and renewables to diversify its source of fuel for power generation.

“The share of coal in our power generation mix is very low at slightly less than 20 percent,” the Energy Minister said at the International Energy Forum last week.

“We need to diversify the sources of fuel for our power generation. Having a reasonable percentage of coal to be used for power generation would be a necessity in considering the security of fuel supply to our generation system.”

In the past Thailand has relied mainly on natural gas

The power demand from the citizens is falling behind consumption, requiring the country to import more piped gas from Myanmar and more liquefied natural gas.

A plan set a few years back by the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) to build coal-fired power plants in the southern Thailand towns of Krabi and Songkhla have been delayed due to opposition from villagers and environmentalists.

“We need to conduct a more global strategic environmental assessment to identify a more suitable location to build a coal-fired power plant that Thailand needs,” Siri said, adding that a decision on the whereabouts of the coal fired power plants locations could be made towards the end of this year (2018).

 

Increase Coal Use in Thailand. Photo supplied by PennEnergy Thailand

Increase Coal Use in Thailand. Photo supplied by PennEnergy Thailand

“In terms of contribution to carbon dioxide generation, Thailand can be considered as one of the lowest in the world,” Siri said.

Authorities increased retail electricity prices by 3.5 percent last year for the first time since 2014, citing rising oil and gas prices.

Falling costs for solar panels has made the renewable resource competitive against fossil fuels.

“We have proven in several pilot projects that we can expand on our success to promote more electricity generation from renewable resources at a price which we call grid parity at 8 cents (per kilowatt hour) on a wholesale basis.”

Going forward, Siri said that Thailand will only be accepting grid-parity prices of electricity generated from renewable/green sources.

Follow this link to read the original article on the Reuters website by Florence Tan in NEW DELHI and Chayut Setboonsarng in BANGKOK; Additional reporting by Promit Mukherjee in NEW DELHI; Editing by Christian Schmollinger

03
Apr

Will Thailand Give Renewable Energy a Chance?

Renewable Energy No More?

The Minister of Energy announced recently that the Thai government will no longer be purchasing electricity from renewable power projects for the next five years to come. The reason behind this is because such projects have caused retail electricity tariffs to increase by 20-25 satangs per unit, and the electricity system apparently has enough installed capacity for now.
If this policy was to be implemented, it will rewind a decade of success that Thailand has achieved on the path toward sustainable energy creation.

give renewable energy a chance

Image provided by Bangkok Post: Monks pass by a solar farm in Ayutthaya. Renewable energy, incubated over the past decade, now is ready to hatch.

Over these past 10 years, Thailand became the leader in Southeast Asia of the renewable energy sector.
As the leader, we produced more clean energy, contributing to reduced greenhouse gas emissions, creating new jobs, utilising local resources, and spurring invaluable know-how and skills for the Thai energy industry.
Renewable energy is also beneficial to the entire electricity system in the country. The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (Egat) has showed how solar power plants have contributed to system peak load reduction, equivalent to around 1 gigawatt of power. This one gigawatt is about the size of a nuclear power plant, or three coal-fired power plants that we have not had to build because of this renewable energy option.

The subsidy for renewables in the past has benefited all Thai people. The problem is that these benefits have not been addressed or quantified by the policymakers. Therefore the argument that renewables cause rate increases is an argument that doesn’t tell the comeplete story.

“By design, the renewable energy subsidy should eventually be cancelled once it becomes competitive with conventional electricity sources. Indeed, we are at a point now where renewable power projects in Thailand may not need a subsidy like they did before.”

“Like eggs that are ready to be hatched, Thailand’s renewable power industry has incubated over the past decade. Just about when the eggs are ready to be hatched, the government should not freeze them. A tangible and fair policy would be to open electricity generation to competition by setting up a bidding process that allows renewable power projects to demonstrate their competitiveness with fossil-fuel based power plants.” 

The original article and opinion piece was supplied by the Bangkok Post. It was written by an independent Energy Consultant based in California, USA, named Sopitsuda Tongsopit, PHD.

Let us know how you feel about this and whether or not you’d be interested in going off-grid, or simply want to have the option to generate your own renewable energy for your home. Eyekandi-Solar is here to assist you!

19
Feb

Power of the Sun

Wandee Khunchornyakong built the first solar farm in Thailand eight years ago. Her company is now the largest solar power supplier in the region. See the original post here from the Bangkok Post

EARLY BIRD

Wandee Khunchornyakong always wakes up at around 5 am. As chairperson and CEO of Solar Power Company Group (SPCG), she likes to start her day when the sun rises.

Her working day ends late. She goes to bed at midnight. Hard work is her routine, which she has kept from a young age. She turns 60 this year, but retirement is not part of the plan.

Wandee built her first – and Thailand’s first – solar farm in 2010. Since then her company has grown in leaps and bounds. SPCG now has 43 subsidiaries. From its headquarters in Thong Lor, it manages 36 solar farms and has expanded the business to Japan and other ASEAN countries. Today SPCG is the largest solar-power-generating company in Southeast Asia.

As a working woman – one of only a handful in the energy industry – she never thought that her dream of generating clean energy would become the huge business it is now.

“I am not somebody who comes from a family with a big name. When I returned to work after early retirement, I chose a business that was innovative and of the kind that nobody had done before,” she said, recalling her original decision to set up the company in 2009.

Wandee had worked as an executive at several companies in different fields, including a solar-cell company. She stepped down in 2006, at the age of 48, to pursue a PhD in Educational Leadership at Suan Dusit University. She thought she would become a teacher in her senior years. But destiny had other plans.

power of the sun_wandee

VISIONARY MIND

Back in 2008, the government announced a policy to promote renewable energy development. It offered a 25-year licence for private companies to operate solar-power plants and feed electricity to the utility grid of the Provincial Electricity Authority (PEA).

At that time, the solar-farm business was in its infancy and wasn’t a priority for financial creditors. For almost a year after the policy was announced, no company applied for a license.

When Wandee learned about the government’s initiative from Dr Piyasawat Amaranand, the former Energy Minister of Surayud Chulanont’s government, it motivated her to research the solar-power-plant business.

“I was interested in solar power because it’s a global trend. I know green technology will be the future for Thailand,” she said.

She spent months studying the business possibilities until she was certain she would have a chance at success. Thailand has strong solar-radiation levels throughout the year when compared to other countries in the region, and even developed countries where solar farms have been implemented, such as Germany and Japan.

“With the same investment for setting up a solar-power plant, a solar farm in Thailand will have more energy output, perhaps double to triple that of developed countries. I knew the possibility of success was high and the risk for failure was very low,” she said.

Get in touch with our Eyekandi Solar team to get a quote for your own solar installation.

29
Dec

BCPG Renewable Energy and the Blockchain

A SET-listed renewable power arm of oil refiner and retailer Bangchak Corporation Plc (BCP), is employing the blockchain to trade and supply Thailand with electricity, says the president and chief executive of BCPG Bundit Sapianchai.

BCPG recently signed an agreement in Bangkok with Perth-based Power Ledger to bring person-to-person renewable energy trading to Thailand and Southeast Asia.

Mr Bundit and Mr Martin signed an agreement with Power Ledger to jointly develop solar power and micro grid systems.

Mr Bundit and Mr Martin signed an agreement with Power Ledger to jointly develop solar power and micro grid systems.

Mr Bundit said BCPG plans to set up the first micro-grid in Bangkok, which will be the first in Southeast Asia to be used by the leading property developer, Sansiri Plc, for its T77 project.

The T77 project will span 80 rai. The first project with a distributed power grid is expected to start operations by mid-2018.

“The Power Ledger energy-trading platform allows building managers to trade renewable energy from solar panels installed at each building with autonomous financial settlement enabled via the use of a secure banking interface,” said Mr Bundit.

If you’re interested in Blockchain technology and how the renewable energy industry is moving forward with it, clock here to read the full article on the Bangkok Post website.
Here at EyeKandi-Solar would love to hear from you and what your thoughts are on the blockchain and paying for your energy this way.

Click here to contact us

08
Dec

Solar Prospects are Bright in Thailand

Solar prospects are becoming brighter, despite the dim policy. Declining costs and other incentives are proving to be beneficial to the renewable energy sector.

Workers install solar panels on a house, which can help residents cut down on their electricity bills. WEERABOON WISARTSAKUL

Workers install solar panels on a house, which can help residents cut down on their electricity bills. WEERABOON WISARTSAKUL

With the cost of installing solar rooftops dropping substantially and energy firms offering several types of business models to encourage consumers, home and building owners are taking advantage of the clean power source, even as energy policymakers have not yet finalised regulations to let private solar rooftop owners sell power to state utilities.

Owners of factories, buildings and residences have installed solar rooftops to produce their own power and cut back on expenses.

With falling development costs, the break-even period for those who have invested in solar power has shortened from 15 years in 2012 to eight years in 2016 to five years now, said Prof Dusit Kruangam, chairman of the Thai Photovoltaic Industries Association.

The current trend should make renewable energy a viable competitor with fossil fuels within a decade.

This price decrease has a huge impact in the solar industry. Eyekandi-Solar is right behind you to offer the best service and solar installation in Thailand.

Click here to contact us for a quote, and read this article further to find out more.

06
Dec

Thailand’s Enserv, KEPID join hands in 1 GW of PV, storage

Enserv Group Co, a Thai renewable energy provider and Korea Electric Power Industrial Development Co (KEPID) intend to install over 1 GW of solar and energy storage facilities in Thailand in a THB-40-billion project.

enserv group solar installation

Photo courtesy of Enserv Group

The Bangkok Post has reported that these two companies have signed a memorandum of understanding, quoting Enserv’s CEO Thanachat Pochana. He said that the goal of the project is to install renewable energy and storage capacity that will make Thailand’s power grid more sustainable.

Enserv, which is prominent in the solar power sector, has more than 258 MW of photovoltaic parks in Thailand, which operate under power purchase agreements (PPAs) with the Thai Provincial Electricity Authority. The company is also engaged in research and development in the energy storage segment, biofuel production and energy trading innovation.

KEPID focuses on reading and recording electricity meters, and delivering electricity bills in South Korea. The company also operates and maintains coal fueled power plants, operates flue gas desulfurization systems and recycles fly ash, purchases and compensates plant sites, and constructs, runs, and leases multi-purpose buildings.

Read more about the Thai renewable energy  plan and other interesting facts about Solar Power in Thailand on our website.

 

 

10
Sep

India could have 25% renewables by 2030 with a million solar jobs

“India could become the fourth largest market for renewable energy in the world by 2030 with 25% renewables in its energy mix, according to a new report by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA).”

The study ‘Renewable energy prospects for India’ picked out solar as having a key role to play becoming the country’s second largest source of renewables generation by 2030 with a 16% share, followed by wind (14%) and hydro (7%). Biofuels, often overlooked in the media discussion of renewables, were tabbed as having a huge 62% chunk of the total renewables capacity due their ability to be used in multiple applications including transport, electricity generation and heating.

"India could become the fourth largest market for renewable energy in the world by 2030 with 25% renewables in its energy mix, according to a new report by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)."

“India could become the fourth largest market for renewable energy in the world by 2030 with 25% renewables in its energy mix, according to a new report by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA).”

The report noted that increasing deployment of renewables would result in 12 times more savings for the economy than its costs by 2030, combined with other benefits in job creation, health and environment. IRENA cited studies indicating that India could have over a million jobs in solar energy and over 180,000 in wind energy just by 2022. But to achieve this, India urgently needs to address and training and skills development shortfall.

The projected renewables additions would also lower the demand for coal and oil products between 17-23% in the same period.’

Click here to read more about India’s growing Solar Industry