Tag: green

27
Sep

Have you ever considered a ‘Green Loan’?

Asian property developers are exploring the use of green loans. Recently, there has been a deal in Singapore where a green loan was used to fund an office tower.

Singapore-based Frasers Property Ltd. raised a S$1.2 billion ($881 million) green loan, the first of its kind by a Southeast Asian borrower under principles set by Asia Pacific Loan Market Association in March that aim to standardize disclosure. The facility refinances existing loans tied to Frasers Tower, an energy efficient office with its own park and podium roof gardens.

Green loan are playing catchup to bond markets, as borrowers are demanding more channels and options for such financing amongst a sustainability backdrop to address the pollution crises created by rapid urbanization and consumerism. The critics of green finance have pointed to a lack of universal standards and measures like for example, the APLMA’s guidelines aim to increase transparency on the use of proceeds and on the environmental impact of projects.

“There are strong returns for banks to get into sectors like green buildings and renewable energy as they are showing very strong financial performance,” said Jonathan Drew, Managing Director, Infrastructure and Real Estate Group, Global Banking Asia-Pacific at HSBC Holdings Plc.

Singapore’s Ho Bee Land Ltd. in August signed a 200 million pound ($264 million) green bridge loan for the acquisition of Ropemaker Place commercial building in London. Hong Kong real estate firm New World Development in March raised a HK$3.6 billion ($461 million) maiden green loan for a commercial re-development project.

“In Hong Kong, we increasingly see property firms that are developing green buildings based on the expectations of tenants, financiers and the community to develop projects that provide higher level of energy efficiency,” said Drew, one of the lenders for New World transaction and the green structuring adviser for Ho Bee Land deal.

Image supplied by Police Bank Australia: Green Loan

Image supplied by Police Bank Australia: Green Loan

Asian borrowers outside of real estate have also been adopting green loans. Hong Kong’s Leo Paper Group this month signed a HK$350 million loan for environmental projects in China. Singapore’s Wilmar International Ltd. this year has raised two separate credit facilities where the interest rate will be reduced based on sustainability targets achieved. Sydney-based Macquarie Group Ltd. in June raised 2 billion pound loan, with tranches to financing renewable energy-efficient projects and buildings.

Have you thought of applying for a green loan for a personal project of yours? If so, how have you gone about doing it? Have you been successful? If so, please share your story with us.

To view the original Bloomberg article, click here.

07
May

Delta Considers Storage Options, Asia

Delta, expanding their horizons

Delta Electronics Thailand is a maker and distributor of power management solutions and electronic components. The company is currently undergoing studies in the feasibility of an energy storage business in response to the global popularity of electric energy. Storage of which comes with it, hand in hand.

It has been confirmed that Delta will team up with the PTT Group and the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) to invest in energy storage in future.

“Our feasibility study is for the energy storage business and the future market, both locally and overseas,” Kittisak Ngoenngokngam, business director for Southeast Asia, said.

“Delta expects this collaboration to be concluded soon.”

Curtis Ku (front), senior business director of Delta, takes Yossapong Laoonual, president of the Electric Vehicle Association of Thailand, to visit Delta's solar rooftop in Bangpoo Industrial Estate. THITI WANNAMONTHA   Bangkok Post

Curtis Ku (front), senior business director of Delta, takes Yossapong Laoonual, president of the Electric Vehicle Association of Thailand, to visit Delta’s solar rooftop in Bangpoo Industrial Estate. THITI WANNAMONTHA
Bangkok Post

Mr Kittisak said that ‘Delta will install trial energy storage of 500 kilowatt-hours at its plant in the Bangpoo Industrial Estate in the third quarter’.

He further said that ‘energy storage will be included in Delta’s business segment of infrastructure together with its solar-panel inverter and charging station for electric vehicles (EVs)’.

Delta has recently provided a 2MW solar rooftop at the Bang Poo plant which supplies ‘quick charges of 25-50 kilowatts (KW)’.

Hsieh Shen-yen, Delta’s president, said that the renewable energy business and energy-saving solutions are a growing global trend. Delta is continuously searching for new opportunities to grow and invest in those business, mainly in the form of mergers and acquisitions in order to keep up with the public demand.

Delta expects 2018 revenue growth of 10% to 50 billion baht, thanks to demand growth for products globally, especially in Asean and India.

Last year, the company posted revenue of 49.3 billion baht, up 5.1%, though net profit fell by 10.6% to 4.9 billion baht.

30
Apr

TSE and the future of Renewable Power Plants

Are Renewable Energy Plants still viable in todays age?

Thai Solar Energy Plc (TSE), believes that “the potential for renewable power plants in Thailand has become unfavourable after energy policymakers have put off plans to buy power generated from renewables for five years.”

Policymakers have further announced that new renewable power producers will equate the feed-in tariff as fossil-fuel power producers, at about 2.40 baht per kilowatt-hour, as their production cost is equal to or lower than their traditional counterparts.

Cathleen Maleenont, TSE’s chairman and chief executive has said that, “The country has no potential to operate a renewable power plant and sell electricity to state utilities because profits will decline under the new rate.”

Some renewable investors operate under a power purchase agreement with the EGAT and Metropolitan Electricity Authority under a business-to-government (B2G) model.  But Ms Maleenont said that “Selling power in the business-to-business (B2B) segment remains of interest to renewable investors because both parties can negotiate on prices and terms.”

“We can invest in renewable power plants in the country for B2B purposes, but there is less business opportunity in the B2G segment,” she said. “For our overseas outlook, TSE is very keen on operating renewable power plants because other governments still offer a high adder rate.”

A TSE-built solar rooftop project in Nakhon Ratchasima. The company is looking to expand its business to provide renewable energy to other countries.  Image supplied by the Bangkok Post

A TSE-built solar rooftop project in Nakhon Ratchasima. The company is looking to expand its business to provide renewable energy to other countries.
Image supplied by the Bangkok Post

TSE Solar plants in Japan

Ms Maleenont said that TSE Overseas Group is in charge of 8 solar power plants across Japan with a total capacity of 176.72 megawatts.

5 of these solar power plants, with a combined capacity of 6.99MW, have already secured income with a feed-in tariff of ¥36 yen (10.41 baht) per kilowatt-hour to sell electricity to Japan’s state utilities on a 20-year long contract.

What do you think about this, and the fact that TSE have said that there has been a decline in renewables? Do we want to set good examples of using renewable and green energy, or do we still want to be consuming and using fossil fuels?

We believe in the future of renewable and solar energy power generation.

Lets us know at Eyekandi-Solar, we’re interested in what you think!