Tag: EGAT

07
May

Delta Considers Storage Options, Asia

Delta, expanding their horizons

Delta Electronics Thailand is a maker and distributor of power management solutions and electronic components. The company is currently undergoing studies in the feasibility of an energy storage business in response to the global popularity of electric energy. Storage of which comes with it, hand in hand.

It has been confirmed that Delta will team up with the PTT Group and the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) to invest in energy storage in future.

“Our feasibility study is for the energy storage business and the future market, both locally and overseas,” Kittisak Ngoenngokngam, business director for Southeast Asia, said.

“Delta expects this collaboration to be concluded soon.”

Curtis Ku (front), senior business director of Delta, takes Yossapong Laoonual, president of the Electric Vehicle Association of Thailand, to visit Delta's solar rooftop in Bangpoo Industrial Estate. THITI WANNAMONTHA   Bangkok Post

Curtis Ku (front), senior business director of Delta, takes Yossapong Laoonual, president of the Electric Vehicle Association of Thailand, to visit Delta’s solar rooftop in Bangpoo Industrial Estate. THITI WANNAMONTHA
Bangkok Post

Mr Kittisak said that ‘Delta will install trial energy storage of 500 kilowatt-hours at its plant in the Bangpoo Industrial Estate in the third quarter’.

He further said that ‘energy storage will be included in Delta’s business segment of infrastructure together with its solar-panel inverter and charging station for electric vehicles (EVs)’.

Delta has recently provided a 2MW solar rooftop at the Bang Poo plant which supplies ‘quick charges of 25-50 kilowatts (KW)’.

Hsieh Shen-yen, Delta’s president, said that the renewable energy business and energy-saving solutions are a growing global trend. Delta is continuously searching for new opportunities to grow and invest in those business, mainly in the form of mergers and acquisitions in order to keep up with the public demand.

Delta expects 2018 revenue growth of 10% to 50 billion baht, thanks to demand growth for products globally, especially in Asean and India.

Last year, the company posted revenue of 49.3 billion baht, up 5.1%, though net profit fell by 10.6% to 4.9 billion baht.

20
Apr

Thai Energy Companies Expand Across Southeast Asia

Thailand’s increase in Energy Usage

Through the technology practices taking place inside individual homes in Southeast Asia, startups including Solar and Wind companies, are expanding dramatically.

For twenty years, the Thai government have implemented renewable energy policies in support of this green tech, of which the country is now reaping the benefits. Oil and Gas Companies are also now profiting after recovering from a three-year slump, increasing electricity demand due to economic growth, and renewable technologies that have finally become competitive against fossil fuels.

Long-standing reform policies have turned Thailand’s state energy company PTT into a successful international oil and gas producer, they have encouraged the development of power producers such as Electricity Generating, and fostered the emergence of renewable energy start-up companies such as Energy Absolute.

“The power businesses in Thailand have developed expertise in this sector, and are now well placed to support energy development across the region,” said Robert Grant, Asia Pacific head at Canadian-listed SNC-Lavalin, a company focused on energy, infrastructure and mining.

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) members have a combined population of more than 600 million people, with an approximate collective GDP of $3 trillion.

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), ASEAN’s energy use rose by 60 % in the last 15 years, which portrays that the region’s demand could grow another 66% by the year 2040.

“You can already see increased activity by Thai investors in the ASEAN region,” Grant said.

The expansion has been reflected in the local stock exchange, with shares of energy companies growing nearly 75% since the start of 2016, against a broader market gain of less than half that.

It’s also sparked a mass broadcast of listings, with Thai power companies having raised more than $2 billion from initial public offerings (IPOs) in 2016 and 2017.

An ‘Ecosystem for Growth’ 

Government policy “created an ecosystem for growth for Thai energy companies,” said Maria Lapiz, head of institutional research at Maybank Kim Eng Securities, with the first reforms coming in the 1990s.

That was the time when the Thai government began allowing small power generators (1-90 megawatts) to sell their power back to the national grid. Thailand was also an earlier adopter of natural gas, which now generates about 60% of the country’s electricity.

‘In 2012, Thailand was one of Asia’s first countries to introduce “feed-in” tariffs to give solar developers additional payments on top of normal prices when selling electricity to utilities, channeling investment into the sector.’

Similar tariffs have been applied to other renewable power sources, including wind, small-scale hydro, biomass and biogas.

The privatization of PTT was another big boost to the energy sector. “PTT was privatized in 2001, which helped drive growth in the energy sector from E&P to refiners and helped in the development of the Thai capital market,” said Lapiz.

According to the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), Thailand is the first Southeast Asian country to be one of the top 15 solar power generators, in the world.

Early Birds in the Renewable Sector

“Thailand started development in renewable power much earlier than regional peers,” said Thidasiri Srisamith, Chief Investment Officer of Kasikorn Asset Management.

Because of the early start and positive relationships with neighbouring countries, Thailand is “a leader in Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam, and will continue to expand into these countries,” she said.

Thailand’s largest solar company Superblock, has plans to grow, with a $1.8 billion  wind farm investment in Vietnam.

Thailand’s biggest wind power generator, Wind Energy Holdings, plans to start investing in solar, hydro and biomass to back up its capacity, not just in Thailand, but also in Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Bangladesh and Australia.

“Going forward, Thai power company growth will depend on the ability to secure capacity and have a steady stream of projects … which (are) increasingly coming from overseas,” said Kasikorn’s Thidasiri.

11
Apr

Greenlots named New Energy Pioneer, Bloomberg

About Greenlots

Greenlots is building the all-electric mobility future by delivering the next-generation of grid-enabled EV smart charging solutions. We enable utilities, cities, businesses and automakers to deploy EV charging infrastructure at scale by offering real-time visibility and control of their charging fleet and transforming EVs into a flexible grid resource.”

greenlots logo

Winners of the New Energy Pioneer award 2018

They have recently been selected as a 2018 New Energy Pioneer by Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF). The winners are selected based on transformative potential and scale, technological innovation and business momentum. Greenlots’ award-winning SKY™ EV charging Network Software manages the activities between the grid and electric vehicles (EVs), EV chargers and solar and battery storage to enable a dynamic energy system that is more efficient and cleaner.

“At Greenlots, we’re dedicated to delivering cutting-edge technology to our customers,” said Brett Hauser, CEO of Greenlots. “Bloomberg New Energy Finance’s recognition of our success is gratifying because they have enormous credibility in our market. The award is further evidence that Greenlots has the top EV charging and grid management product.” Hauser will accept the award today at the Bloomberg Future of Energy Summit in New York.

Operating the largest open fast-charging network in North America, Greenlots provides EV charging software and expertise that enables utilities, cities, communities and automakers to deploy large-scale EV charging infrastructure. They provides utilities the ability to remotely control grid loads through smart charging, demand response and behind-the-meter energy storage solutions. By enabling utilities to manage complex energy loads, the company ensures that charging investments are strategic, accessible and future-proof to avoid stranded assets and to support widespread electric vehicle growth.

Recent achievements at Greenlots

Over the past 5 years, the company’s global network has delivered approximately 5 million kWh of energy over 500,000 charging sessions, reducing approximately 10 million pounds of CO2. In January, Volkswagen subsidiary Electrify America selected Greenlots as the sole provider for their network operating platform, which will manage Electrify America’s $2 billion network of high-power fast chargers that will expand highway and other EV charging capabilities across the United States. In addition, they were recently selected as a provider of cloud-based network services for Thailand‘s leading state-owned utility, the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT), alongside its ongoing work with BMW’s ChargeNow in Thailand.

Each year, BNEF identifies 10 cutting edge companies globally in the field of clean energy technology and innovation. A panel of industry experts chose Greenlots and the other winners.

The original article can be viewed here on the PR Newswire website.

03
Apr

Will Thailand Give Renewable Energy a Chance?

Renewable Energy No More?

The Minister of Energy announced recently that the Thai government will no longer be purchasing electricity from renewable power projects for the next five years to come. The reason behind this is because such projects have caused retail electricity tariffs to increase by 20-25 satangs per unit, and the electricity system apparently has enough installed capacity for now.
If this policy was to be implemented, it will rewind a decade of success that Thailand has achieved on the path toward sustainable energy creation.

give renewable energy a chance

Image provided by Bangkok Post: Monks pass by a solar farm in Ayutthaya. Renewable energy, incubated over the past decade, now is ready to hatch.

Over these past 10 years, Thailand became the leader in Southeast Asia of the renewable energy sector.
As the leader, we produced more clean energy, contributing to reduced greenhouse gas emissions, creating new jobs, utilising local resources, and spurring invaluable know-how and skills for the Thai energy industry.
Renewable energy is also beneficial to the entire electricity system in the country. The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (Egat) has showed how solar power plants have contributed to system peak load reduction, equivalent to around 1 gigawatt of power. This one gigawatt is about the size of a nuclear power plant, or three coal-fired power plants that we have not had to build because of this renewable energy option.

The subsidy for renewables in the past has benefited all Thai people. The problem is that these benefits have not been addressed or quantified by the policymakers. Therefore the argument that renewables cause rate increases is an argument that doesn’t tell the comeplete story.

“By design, the renewable energy subsidy should eventually be cancelled once it becomes competitive with conventional electricity sources. Indeed, we are at a point now where renewable power projects in Thailand may not need a subsidy like they did before.”

“Like eggs that are ready to be hatched, Thailand’s renewable power industry has incubated over the past decade. Just about when the eggs are ready to be hatched, the government should not freeze them. A tangible and fair policy would be to open electricity generation to competition by setting up a bidding process that allows renewable power projects to demonstrate their competitiveness with fossil-fuel based power plants.” 

The original article and opinion piece was supplied by the Bangkok Post. It was written by an independent Energy Consultant based in California, USA, named Sopitsuda Tongsopit, PHD.

Let us know how you feel about this and whether or not you’d be interested in going off-grid, or simply want to have the option to generate your own renewable energy for your home. Eyekandi-Solar is here to assist you!

12
Jan

EGAT says the Market Quota will now end

Energy policymakers are currently planning to end the twenty year quota regime by expanding the state-controlled power generation business to private sector competition, quoted by the Energy Minister himself Mr Siri Jirapongphun.

Thailand will now be removing the special quota from state-owned Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT). “Thailand needs to increase power supply and allowing the market to set its price will be essential to developing the power generation industry,” he said.
The deregulation of power generation will be applied to both the renewable energy industry as well as the fossil fuels industry.

The power price is currently at an average of 3.6 baht per kilowatt hour.

Egat's Mae Moh power plant in Lampang. Both fossil fuels and renewable energy will be deregulated. JIRAPORN KUHAKAN

EGAT’s Mae Moh power plant in Lampang. Both fossil fuels and renewable energy will be deregulated. JIRAPORN KUHAKAN

By JUNE 2018, policymakers have planned to open an auction under the small power producer programme, which will involve semi-firm power purchase agreements with a total of 269 megawatts.
The move is aimed at advancing the efficiency of the sector, of EGAT, and of other state-owned energy firms like PTT Plc.

Details of the deregulation programme will become finalised in the new national Power Development Plan (PDP), which is currently being revised by the relevant department.  The new PDP, set to be finalised in March 31, will replace the existing PDP, which was drafted in 2014.

The current rules that state that one fifth of the country’s power must come from renewable energy sources by the year 2036 may also undergo major revisions. At present, renewable energy sources in Thailand account for 12% of the country’s power.

Companies from the private sector and EGAT (which recently expressed interest in importing LNG), will now be allowed to enter the business, which previously fell under the monopoly of PTT.

 

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Find the original Bangkok Post article here.