30
Jul

Opportunities in the Thai Solar Energy sector

A significant increase in Thai Solar Energy since 2010 has seen a climb from almost nothing to a total of 3 GW of solar installations in the country! This already satisfies half of their target for the year 2036… 

There have been seven opportunties outlined by the prestigious International Lawyers. Pugnatorius which we have inlcuded below. To see the original article written by Praktikantin, click here.

Image supplied by PV Tech Thai Solar Energy

Image supplied by PV Tech
Thai Solar Energy

seven opportunites

  1. New solar tenders: There will be new public tender procedures to develop more solar farms in Thailand. It can be expected that the bidding processes in 2018 will have more strict regulatory requirements concerning the location, capacity, PPA conditions, and overall feasibility of the tenders.

  2.  Off-market solar farms: Many solar energy projects are realized off-market and outside of a formal public tender process. Foreign investors will need a close connection and cooperation with a Thai partner and may have to adjust their business policies to local standards. Keeping the projects local have an advantage for the Thai economy!

  3. Acquisition of existing solar farms: During the last few years there was a flourishing trade of electricity production licenses and power purchase agreements, several semi-finished or already established and electricity producing solar farms are now for sale. These projects can be acquired through an asset acquisition or the transfer of the shares in the solar farm company.

  4. Utilization of own rooftops: As a cost-effective way to leverage solar energy, commercial and industrial property owners are allowed to install solar panels onto their own roofs and to produce electricity “behind-the-meter” for self-consumption. See one of Eyekandi-Solar’s previous post. Such investment can be delivered, financed and maintained by third parties under EPC (Engineering, Procurement, and Construction), O&M (Operating & Maintenance) and finance agreements.

  5. Solar rooftop investments: Under Thailand’s upcoming solar rooftop legislation, (foreign) investors and developers are (hopefully) allowed (i) to cooperate with commercial and industrial rooftop owners, (ii) to generate electricity, (iii) to sell the electricity to the grid (net metering) and (iv) to enter into power purchase agreements with commercial and industrial parties (C&I PPA).

  6. Floating solar farms: As the Third Way, the development of floating solar arrays (floatovoltaics) should be the next big thing. New projects are available and provide for an attractive return on investment, independently from the pending rooftop legislation. Details can be found at “Floating solar farms in Thailand“. Eyekandi-Solar recently wrote about the floating solar farm in Rayong, see article here.

  7.  Internet of (Solar) Energy: Internet of Energy (IoE) means the implementation of Internet of Things (IoT) technology with distributed energy systems to optimize the efficiency of the generation, transmission, and utilization of electricity. As soon as Thailand and its regulatory framework are ready for a peer-to-peer energy trading community, every person can trade their energy directly, using a blockchain technology without any middleman. Are you familiar with SolarCoin?

    Solar coin

Are there any opportunities which they may have missed, that you feel are important to highlight? Get in touch with us and let us know.

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